First Aid chapter 5 questions

As a check to see if you understood the chapter five material

and as a review for possible questions on the final,

AFTER you read the chapter, try to see if you can answer these questions:

 

“What should you do when a person is showing signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis?”

 

“If you are alone and there is no one to send to call 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number, what should you do?”

 

“What should you do for a person who is having a seizure?”
 

“What are some common causes of fainting?”

 

“Has anyone ever fainted, or seen someone else faint? If so, were there any warning signs and symptoms?”
 

“What is the first thing you should do when a person faints?”
 

“If the person is responsive and breathing normally, what should you do?”
 

“If the person is not responsive and is not breathing or is only gasping, what should you do?”
 

“Which one of the following could be a sign or symptom of a diabetic emergency: confusion or
disorientation; swelling of the face, neck, tongue or lips; or chest pain?”

 
“ You think that a person is having a heart attack. What should you do first?”

 
“Why is it important to call 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number as soon as signs
and symptoms of heart attack are recognized?”

 
“ Which of the following could be a sign or symptom of stroke: nausea or vomiting; drooping
on one side of the face; or profuse sweating?”

 

“ Name a condition under which you should call 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number for a
diabetic emergency.”

 

“ A person is having trouble breathing and is showing signs and symptoms of shock. What
condition should you consider first?”

 

“ Name something that can trigger an asthma attack.”
 

“What does FAST stand for?”
 

“A person is having a seizure. After the seizure is over, you check the person for responsiveness and find that she is responsive. What should you do?”

 

“Nausea or vomiting can be a sign or symptom of heart attack—true or false?”

 

“A person having a heart attack always experiences chest pain—true or false?”
 

“A person is having a diabetic emergency. The person is responsive and able to swallow. How
many grams of sugar should you give the person?”

 

“ Name an acceptable form of sugar to give to a person in a diabetic emergency.”
 

Give yourself a moment to think about each question, then scroll down past these photos to find the correct answers.

cliff edge with railing
 

mountains with part of full moon behind them, water in the foreground

 

Yosemite falls and part of Yosemite Valley
 

Here are the questions with the answers:

 

“What should you do when a person is showing signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis?”

Have someone call 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number immediately.

Help the person use medication (e.g., epinephrine) for the emergency treatment of anaphylaxis.

Make sure the person is sitting in a comfortable position, or have the person lie down if he or she is showing signs of shock.

 
“If you are alone and there is no one to send to call 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number, what should you do?”

Help the person use medication for the emergency treatment of anaphylaxis, and then call 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number.

 

“What should you do for a person who is having a seizure?”

Let the seizure run its course.

Remove nearby furniture or other objects that could cause injury if the person hits them during the seizure.

When the seizure is over, check the person for responsiveness and breathing. If the person is responsive and breathing normally, check the person from head to toe (looking for injuries that may have occurred as a result of the seizure) and place the person in the recovery position if there are no apparent injuries.

Stay with the person until he or she is fully recovered and aware of his or her surroundings.

 
“What are some common causes of fainting?”

Dehydration

Being too hot

Being in a crowded or stuffy room

Intense emotion

Low blood pressure

Standing up too quickly after sitting or bending over for an extended period of time

 
“Has anyone ever fainted, or seen someone else faint? If so, were there any warning signs and symptoms?”

The person became pale.

The person began to sweat.

The person complained of dizziness or weakness.

 
“What is the first thing you should do when a person faints?”

Check for responsiveness and breathing.
 

“If the person is responsive and breathing normally, what should you do?”

Check the person from head to toe for injuries that might have happened as
a result of the fall.

Put the person into the recovery position, if there are no injuries.

Call 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number if the person is injured or you have any concerns about the person’s condition.

Have the person follow up with his or her healthcare provider.

 
“If the person is not responsive and is not breathing or is only gasping, what should you do?”

Begin CPR immediately and use an AED as soon as one is available, if trained in giving CPR and using an AED.

 
“Which one of the following could be a sign or symptom of a diabetic emergency: confusion or
disorientation; swelling of the face, neck, tongue or lips; or chest pain?”

Confusion or disorientation

 
“ You think that a person is having a heart attack. What should you do first?”

Call 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number.

 
“Why is it important to call 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number as soon as signs
and symptoms of heart attack are recognized?”

Seeking advanced medical care as soon as the signs and symptoms of a heart attack are
recognized can minimize damage to the heart and may save the person’s life.

 
“ Which of the following could be a sign or symptom of stroke: nausea or vomiting; drooping
on one side of the face; or profuse sweating?”

Drooping on one side of the face

 

“ Name a condition under which you should call 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number for a
diabetic emergency.”

the person is or becomes unresponsive;

the person cannot swallow;

the person does not feel better within about 10 to 15 minutes after taking sugar; or you cannot immediately find a source of sugar.

 
“ A person is having trouble breathing and is showing signs and symptoms of shock. What
condition should you consider first?”

Anaphylaxis

 
“ Name something that can trigger an asthma attack.”

exercise,

temperature extremes,

allergies,

irritants (e.g., dust, smoke, pollution),

strong odors (e.g., perfume, cologne, scented cleaning products),

respiratory infections,

and stress or anxiety.

 
“What does FAST stand for?”

Face, arms, speech, time

 
“A person is having a seizure. After the seizure is over, you check the person for responsiveness and find that she is responsive. What should you do?”

Put the person in the recovery position if she has no apparent injuries, and stay with the person
until she is fully recovered.

 
“Nausea or vomiting can be a sign or symptom of heart attack—true or false?”

True

 

“A person having a heart attack always experiences chest pain—true or false?”

False

 

“A person is having a diabetic emergency. The person is responsive and able to swallow. How
many grams of sugar should you give the person?”

15 to 20 grams of sugar

Do not spend time looking for sugar; call 911.

 
“ Name an acceptable form of sugar to give to a person in a diabetic emergency.”

glucose tablets,

candies that can be chewed,

fruit juice,

fruit strips,

regular (not diet) soda,

milk,

or a spoonful of sugar mixed into a glass of water.