First Aid chapter 6 questions

As a check to see if you understood the chapter six material

and as a review for possible questions on the final,

AFTER you read the chapter, try to see if you an answer these questions:

 
“What are some common causes of nosebleeds?”
 
“How should you care for a nosebleed?”
 
“What should you do if the nosebleed is severe?

 
“What are some factors that could make a burn critical?”

 
Fact or Fiction: Put ointment or butter on a burn to soothe the pain.”

 
“Fact or Fiction: A sunburn is a type of thermal burn.”
 

“Fact or Fiction: When a person has experienced an electrical burn, you need to be prepared to give PR and use an AED.”

 
“Fact or Fiction: Apply ice to a burn to cool it.

 
“Fact or Fiction: It is important to monitor for shock when a person has been burned.”

 
“Fact or Fiction: When a person has been burned by a chemical in powdered form, you should remove the chemical by flushing the area with cool running water.”

 

“Fact or Fiction: When a person has experienced an electrical burn, you should not go near the person until the electricity has been turned off at the source.”

 
“Has anyone ever experienced a muscle, bone or joint injury? What signs and symptoms let you know that something was wrong?”

 

“What is a concussion?”

 
“What can cause a concussion?”

 
“Can a concussion be caused by a seemingly minor accident?”

 
“Are signs and symptoms of a concussion always obvious right away?”

“ 

“Does a person with a concussion always lose consciousness?”

 

“What signs and symptoms might cause you to suspect a head, neck or spinal injury?”

Give yourself a moment to think about each question, then scroll down past these photos to find the correct answers.

 

bright sunset clouds
 

many types of wildflowers
 

moon full showing through clouds
 

Here are the questions with the answers:

 
“What are some common causes of nosebleeds?”

■ Trauma (getting hit in the face)
■ Exposure to dry air or old air
■ High blood pressure
■ Use of certain mediations (e.g., blood thinners)

 
“How should you care for a nosebleed?”

■ Have the person sit, leaning slightly forward.
Pinch the person’s nostrils together until the bleeding stops.

 
“What should you do if the nosebleed is severe?

■ all 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number.
■ continue to pinch the nostrils together.
 
“What are some factors that could make a burn critical?”

The depth of the burn;

The percentage of the body’s surface area that is burned; (more than one body part, or a large percentage of the person’s total body area)

the location of the burn; (hands, feet or groin; head neck or mouth; or affect the person’s ability to breathe; and circumferential burns – those that go all the way around a limb)

the age of the person; (younger than 5 years or older than 60 years, unless the burn is very minor)

the cause of the burn (electricity, exposure to chemicals, exposure to nuclear radiation, or an explosion)

 
“Fact or Fiction: Put ointment or butter on a burn to soothe the pain.”

Fiction Placing greasy substances (such as ointment or butter) on a burn is not effective for relieving
pain or promoting healing. Greasy substances can seal in the heat and make the burn worse.

 
“Fact or Fiction: A sunburn is a type of thermal burn.”

Fiction Sunburn is caused by overexposure to the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays and is a type of radiation
burn.

 

“Fact or Fiction: When a person has experienced an electrical burn, you need to be prepared to give PR and use an AED.”

Fact The electrical current that caused the burn can also cause a cardiac or respiratory emergency.

 
“Fact or Fiction: Apply ice to a burn to cool it.

Fiction Never use ice to cool a burn; this can cause more damage to the skin.

 
“Fact or Fiction: It is important to monitor for shock when a person has been burned.”

Fat Burns of all types can cause a person to go into shock.

 
“Fact or Fiction: When a person has been burned by a chemical in powdered form, you should remove the chemical by flushing the area with cool running water.”

Fiction When a chemical is in powdered form, first remove as much of it as possible by brushing it away with gloved hands or a cloth. Then flush the area with cool running water for 15 minutes
or until EMS personnel arrive.

 

“Fact or Fiction: When a person has experienced an electrical burn, you should not go near the person until the electricity has been turned off at the source.”

Fact Never go near the person until you are sure the electricity has been turned off at the source.

 
“Fact or Fiction: To cool a thermal burn, use cool or cold potable water.”

Fact A thermal burn can be cooled using cool or cold potable water.

 
“Has anyone ever experienced a muscle, bone or joint injury? What signs and symptoms let you know that something was wrong?”

Pain

Swelling

Bruising

An inability or unwillingness to move the injured body part

The injured body part was bent, rooked or otherwise deformed

A “popping” or “snapping” feeling or sound at the time of injury

A “grating” feeling or sound when moving the injured body part

 

“What is a concussion?”

A traumatic brain injury that alters the way the brain functions

 
“What can cause a concussion?”

A bump, blow or jolt to the head or body that results in rapid movement of
the head

 
“Can a concussion be caused by a seemingly minor accident?”

Yes.

 
“Are signs and symptoms of a concussion always obvious right away?”

No. Sometimes the effects of a concussion are not seen for hours or even
days after the injury.

“ 

“Does a person with a concussion always lose consciousness?”

No. Some people who have sustained a concussion may lose consciousness briefly, but not everyone does.

 

“What signs and symptoms might cause you to suspect a head, neck or spinal injury?”

The mechanism of injury (e.g., a fall from a height, a traumatic injury involving machinery or a vehicle, a blow to the head, entering a shallow body of water headfirst)

A broken safety helmet

Loss of consciousness (may be brief)

Behavior similar to that of a person under the influence of alcohol or drugs
(e.g., confusion, stumbling, repeatedly asking the same questions, memory loss, nausea or vomiting, speech problems)

Head, neck or back pain

Partial or complete loss of sensation or movement in part of the body

Bumps, bruises or a depressed area on the head, neck or spine

Blood-tinged or clear fluids leaking from the ear or nose

Bruising around the eyes or behind the ears

Impaired breathing

Blurred vision or sensitivity to light

Seizures

 

The world’s longest list of times / situations to suspect a head, neck or spinal injury are at this webpage.

 

Optional for you to read, a frequently asked question:

 
“How do I know if a wound needs stitches?”

A good rule of thumb is, “If you think the wound needs stitches, it probably does.”

In general, the following types of wounds often require stitches:

Wounds that are deep or longer than ½ inch

Wounds on parts of the body where scarring could impair appearance or function (for example, the face, hands or feet)

Wounds caused by human or animal bites

Wounds with jagged edges that gape open

Wounds that are bleeding heavily and uncontrollably