First Aid chapter 7 questions

As a check to see if you understood the chapter seven material

and as a review for possible questions on the final,

AFTER you read the chapter, try to see if you an answer these questions:

 
“Fact or Fiction? In order from least to most severe, the heat-related illnesses are heat exhaustion, heat ramps and heat stroke.”

 

“Fact or Fiction? The best prevention strategy for heat-related illnesses is to stay properly hydrated.”

 

“Fact or Fiction? Heat-related illnesses only affect people who are outdoors.”
 

“Fact or Fiction? Heat stroke is life threatening.”

 

“Fact or Fiction? If recognized early, heat ramps and heat exhaustion can usually be corrected with first aid measures.

 

“Fact or Fiction? If a person is experiencing signs and symptoms of a heat-related illness, is responsive and is able to swallow, you should offer the person small amounts of a cool drink containing carbohydrates and electrolytes (such as a commercial sports drink, coconut water or milk), or water if one of these options is not available.

 

“Does the air or water temperature have to be below freezing for hypothermia to occur?”

 

“What factors an increase a person’s risk for hypothermia?”

 

“You come across a person who you believe may have hypothermia. Should you:

A) Get the person someplace where he or she can take a hot bath or shower

B) Give the person a shot of brandy or a cup of coffee

C) Move the person to a warmer environment, make sure the person is wearing dry clothing and wrap him or her in a blanket?”

 

“If you suspect that a person has hypothermia, you should:”
 

“Fact or Fiction? Frostbite can be treated by rubbing snow over the affected area.”

 

“Fact or Fiction? Gently massage the frostbitten area to restore circulation and warm it up.

 

“Fact or Fiction? Immerse the frostbitten area in hot water, apply a heating pad or hold it lose to a fire to rewarm the tissues.”

 

“How can poisons enter the body?”

 

“Can you give me some examples of poisons?”

Instead of Fact or Fiction, the Red Cross set these questions up as an ENVIRONMENTAL EMERGENCY JEOPARDY. The answers are supposed to all start with:

“What is. . .”

But you can leave out the ‘What is. . ” when you answer them.

 

“What is a substance that causes injury, illness or death if it enters the body.”

“ Drinking this is the best way to prevent heat-related illnesses.”

 

“ What is a good drink to offer a person who has hypothermia”.

 

“What is condition characterized by cramps in the legs and abdomen.”

 

“The first aid treatment for this condition could include immersion in warm water.”

 

“ This heat-related illness is life threatening.”

 

“Call this number for a suspected poisoning if the person does not have signs or symptoms of a
life-threatening condition.”

 

“Wet or windy conditions increase a person’s risk for this.”

 

What is a good drink to offer when a person has heat exhaustion?

 

“Immerse the person up to his or her neck in old water or place ice-water-soaked towels
over the person’s entire body to give first aid for this condition.”

Give yourself a moment to think about each question, then scroll down past these photos to find the correct answers.
 

Sandhill Crane

 

peregrine falcon from below

 

Magpie with widespread wings

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Bald Eagle just above the water, flying off with a fish

 

Osprey with wings wide out

 

Here are the questions with the answers:

 

“Fact or Fiction? In order from least to most severe, the heat-related illnesses are heat exhaustion, heat cramps and heat stroke.”

Fiction In order from least to most severe, the heat related illnesses are heat ramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
 

“Fact or Fiction? The best prevention strategy for heat-related illnesses is to stay properly hydrated.”

Fact Staying hydrated helps to make sure fluids lost through sweating are replaced, which helps to
reduce the risk for experiencing a heat-related illness. Water is the best choice of fluid for staying hydrated. Drink a few ounces every 15 to 20 minutes or however much you need to not feel thirsty.

 

“Fact or Fiction? Heat-related illnesses only affect people who are outdoors.”

Fiction Being outdoors is a risk factor for developing a heat-related illness, but these illnesses an
also affect people who are indoors. People who live or work in buildings that are inadequately
cooled or ventilated are at risk, as are those who perform indoor jobs in hot, humid environments
(e.g., kitchen and laundry workers, factory workers).
 

“Fact or Fiction? Heat stroke is life threatening.”

Fact A person who is showing signs and symptoms of heat stroke needs immediate cooling and medical attention because heat stroke can be fatal.

 

“Fact or Fiction? If recognized early, heat ramps and heat exhaustion can usually be corrected with first aid measures.

Fact When a heat-related illness is recognized in its early stages and proper care is provided, it can usually be reversed.

 

“Fact or Fiction? If a person is experiencing signs and symptoms of a heat-related illness, is responsive and is able to swallow, you should offer the person small amounts of a cool drink containing carbohydrates and electrolytes (such as a commercial sports drink, coconut water or milk), or water if one of these options is not available.

Fact A cool drink containing carbohydrates and electrolytes (such as a commerial sports drink, coconut water or milk) is preferred for rehydrating when a person is experiencing signs and symptoms of a heat-related illness. Cool water can be given instead if a drink containing carbohydrates and electrolytes is not available. Only give the person fluids if the person is responsive and able to swallow, and encourage
the person to take small sips rather than gulping the drink down quickly.

 

“Does the air or water temperature have to be below freezing for hypothermia to occur?”

No. The air or water temperature does not need to be below freezing for hypothermia to occur.

 

“What factors an increase a person’s risk for hypothermia?”

Prolonged exposure to cold

Wet or windy conditions

Wet clothing

 

“You come across a person who you believe may have hypothermia. Should you:
C) Get the person someplace where he or she can take a hot bath or shower

D) Give the person a shot of brandy or a cup of coffee

C ) Move the person to a warmer environment, make sure the person is wearing dry clothing and wrap him or her in a blanket?”

“A” is incorrect because a hot shower or bath would cause rapid rewarming, which an cause dangerous heart rhythm abnormalities.

“B” is incorrect. Alcoholic beverages and beverages with caffeine should not be given. If the person is alert and able to swallow, you can give him or her small sips of a warm beverage like broth or water.
The correct answer is C“.

 

“If you suspect that a person has hypothermia, you should:”

● all 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number.

● Move the person to a warmer place.

● Remove wet clothing and dry the person.

● Help the person to warm up gradually by helping him or her to put on dry clothing (including a hat, gloves and socks) and wrapping the person in a blanket.

 

“Fact or Fiction? Frostbite can be treated by rubbing snow over the affected area.”

Fiction Treatment of frostbite starts with gradual rewarming. Rubbing snow or anything else on
the affected area only causes additional pain and tissue damage.

 

“Fact or Fiction? Gently massage the frostbitten area to restore circulation and warm it up.

Fiction Handle the frostbitten area gently. Massaging or rubbing the affected area an cause additional
pain and tissue damage.

 

“Fact or Fiction? Immerse the frostbitten area in hot water, apply a heating pad or hold it lose to a fire to rewarm the tissues.”

Fiction Rewarming the frostbitten area with direct heat can cause additional damage, including burns.

 

“How can poisons enter the body?”

Swallowed

Inhaled

Absorbed through the skin or eyes

Injected

 

“Can you give me some examples of poisons?”

cleaning and laundry products (detergent “pods” are particularly attractive to children)

Items commonly stored in garages and sheds, such as car maintenance products, bug and weed killers, fertilizers and paints

Medications and vitamins (when taken by the wrong person or in the wrong dose)

Plants (both houseplants and outdoor plants)

Gases, such as carbon monoxide and industrial gases
 

Instead of Fact or Fiction, the Red Cross set these questions up as an ENVIRONMENTAL EMERGENCY JEOPARDY. The answers are supposed to all start with:

“What is. . .”

 

“What is a substance that causes injury, illness or death if it enters the body.”

What is a poison?
 

“ Drinking this is the best way to prevent heat-related illnesses.”

What is water?
 

“ What is a good drink to offer a person who has hypothermia”.

What is warm broth or water?
 

“What is condition characterized by cramps in the legs and abdomen.”

What are heat cramps?
 

“The first aid treatment for this condition could include immersion in warm water.”

What is frostbite?
 

“ This heat-related illness is life threatening.”

What is heat stroke?
 

“Call this number for a suspected poisoning if the person does not have signs or symptoms of a
life-threatening condition.”

What is 1-800-222-1222 (the national Poison Help hotline)?

 

“Wet or windy conditions increase a person’s risk for this.”

What is hypothermia?

 

What is a good drink to offer when a person has heat exhaustion?

What is a commercial sports drink, coconut water or milk?
 

“Immerse the person up to his or her neck in old water or place ice-water-soaked towels
over the person’s entire body to give first aid for this condition.”

What is heat stroke?

carved wood ceiling beam

In answer to a question, the birds above are a

Sandhill Crane,

Peregrine Falcon

Magpie,

Bald Eagle,

Osprey

all of which people have seen on the De Anza Outdoor Club between summer quarter and fall quarter trip to Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming.