KNES 001D

De Anza College swimming logo: the words De Anza College below a line drawing of water waves and a person swimmingKNES 001D (formerly P.E. 26D) is the advanced swimming class at De Anza.

The first day of advanced swim class I do a survey of what people want out of the class and what skills they have. I cover the required curriculum and try to meet people’s needs as well. Some students want a ‘get ready for lifeguard training class’, some want to get ready to learn to scuba dive or try a triathlon. Some want a review of all the strokes, others want mostly to get in shape. Every quarter, in every swim class I teach, I videotape at least each student’s freestyle (unless you really don’t want to be taped). People tell me they learned more from seeing their stroke than from years of swim drills.

I don’t assume that anyone has been on a swim team. I teach almost everything from scratch. You don’t have to already know how to dive into a pool or do a turn. You should be quite at ease in deep water and have most freestyle and backstroke basics down.

I expect that even in an intermediate, advanced or aerobic swim class class, many of the students will not have been doing a lot of swimming recently and might be out of shape, so there is no 500 yard prerequisite swim test. I also don’t expect all the strokes from higher level swimmers, as it has been my experience that most C/D/6G swimmers don’t have a butterfly, for example.

Most intermediate, advanced and aerobic swim classes have students with a wide variety of skills. Sometimes people take a different level of swim class just because it is held at the right time for their schedule. Sometimes really good swimmers take intermediate because they are afraid that advanced might be too much work.

Bring your swimsuit and gear because we will get in the water the first day. We will need to spend a lot of time on paperwork, but will at least do a short swim test of freestyle and backstroke to see if if anyone would get more out of a beginning swim class.

racing dive border:

How to find the De Anza pools, sunscreen, P/NP grading, waitlists and more

are covered at

Swim classes FAQs

See also: How to get a P.E. locker at De Anza College

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Winter quarter De Anza College usually offers an intermediate, advanced and aerobic swim class Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 11:50.

I suggest that if you have not taken intermediate or advanced swim at De Anza before you should sign up for intermediate, KNES 001C. If you have taken both intermediate and advanced swim, (or just intermediate), you can’t repeat them, so sign up for aerobic swim, KNES 002A.

NOTES TO STUDENTS DURING QUARTERS I TEACH ADVANCED SWIMMING

and homework assignments will be at: KNES 001C since they are the same for intermediate and advanced swim students, and even aerobic swim students, when I teach the classes together.

You do not need to buy a textbook for any class I teach.

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Practice on a stand-up paddleboard (SUP) is optional, and not always a part of the last day of class:

woman in a lifejacket on a stand-up paddleboard at a swimming pool