First Aid class wrap-up questions

The Red Cross asks these questions of first aid class students as the class is finishing to see how well you understood the basics.

Try to see if you can answer these questions. Some of them ask you for two things / examples, but the official answer will give you five or six, so you may find yourself thinking of many things even though the “question” only asks for two.

 

“True or false: When the injured or ill person is a child, you must obtain consent to give are from the child’s parent, if he or she is present.”
 

“True or false: If a person is unresponsive and in need of first aid, consent is implied.”
 

“True or false: If you see an adult suddenly collapse and you are alone, you should all 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number first.”
 

“True or false: First aid care for shock includes offering the person water.”
 

“True or false: Heat stroke is life threatening.”

 

“True or false: Any serious injury or illness can lead to shock.”
 
“ True or false: A person who has sustained a blow to the head only needs to be evaluated for concussion if he or she loses consciousness.”

 

“A person suddenly develops a nosebleed. What should you do?”
 

“A person has cut himself and is bleeding heavily. While you work to control the bleeding, you notice that he is showing signs and symptoms of shock. EMS has been called. What should you do?”

 

“You are applying direct pressure to control external bleeding. The person is still bleeding and blood
is starting to seep through the dressing. EMS has been called. What should you do?”

 

“A person has been exerting himself outside on a hot and humid day. Now he is complaining of nausea, a headache and weakness. His skin is cool and moist, and he appears pale. The person is responsive and awake. What should you do?”

 

“A person has fallen down the steps. She is responsive and complaining of back pain. What should you do? “

 

“A person tripped and fell and is now complaining of knee pain. The knee appears deformed. What should you do?”

 

“A person begins to choke on a piece of food. You ask the person if you can help. He is unable to answer you, but nods. He has a weak, ineffective cough. What should you do?”

 

“What is the best way to check to see if an adult or child is unresponsive? An infant?”

 

“Name two things you should be prepared to tell the dispatcher when calling 9-1-1 or the designated
emergency number.”

 

“Why is it important to remove soiled gloves properly?”

 

“Name two signs and symptoms of hypothermia.”

 

“Name an injury that could cause a concussion.”

 

“Name two signs and symptoms of shock.”

 

“Name two signs and symptoms of a muscle, bone or joint injury.”

 

“What does the mnemonic RICE stand for?”
 

“Name two factors that could make it necessary to all 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number for a burn injury.” – a critical burn

 

Name two signs and symptoms of a heart attack.

 

Give yourself a moment to think about each question, then scroll down past these photos to find the correct answers.

 

ripples from drops on water
 

stars, including part of the Milky Way
 

breaking wave catching sunlight

Here are the questions with the answers:

 

“True or false: When the injured or ill person is a child, you must obtain consent to give are from the child’s parent, if he or she is present.”

True

 

“True or false: If a person is unresponsive and in need of first aid, consent is implied.”

True

 

“True or false: If you see an adult suddenly collapse and you are alone, you should all 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number first.”

True

 

“True or false: First aid care for shock includes offering the person water.”

False

 

“True or false: Heat stroke is life threatening.”

True

 

“True or false: Any serious injury or illness can lead to shock.”

True

 

“ True or false: A person who has sustained a blow to the head only needs to be evaluated for concussion if he or she loses consciousness.”

False
 

“A person suddenly develops a nosebleed. What should you do?”

Obtain consent. Put on gloves. Have the person sit down, lean slightly forward and pinch the nostrils shut for 10 minutes.

 

“A person has cut himself and is bleeding heavily. While you work to control the bleeding, you notice that he is showing signs and symptoms of shock. EMS has been called. What should you do?”

Have the person lie down. Continue to control the bleeding. over the person with a blanket. Provide reassurance.

 

“You are applying direct pressure to control external bleeding. The person is still bleeding and blood
is starting to seep through the dressing. EMS has been called. What should you do?”

Apply another dressing on top of the first, continue to apply direct pressure (pressing harder than you
did before, if possible), and monitor the person for signs and symptoms of shock.

 

“A person has been exerting himself outside on a hot and humid day. Now he is complaining of nausea, a headache and weakness. His skin is cool and moist, and he appears pale. The person is responsive and awake. What should you do?”

Size up the scene and form an initial impression. Obtain consent. Move the person to a cooler place; loosen or remove as much clothing as possible; cool the person’s body by applying cool, wet cloths; spray the person with water or fan the person; offer cool fluid (sports drink, coconut water, milk or water) every 15 minutes; monitor for changes in condition; and all 9-1-1 or the
designated emergency number if the person’s condition does not improve.

 

“A person has fallen down the steps. She is responsive and complaining of back pain. What should you do?”

Size up the scene and form an initial impression. Obtain consent. all 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number. Have the person stay still until EMS personnel arrive.

 

“A person tripped and fell and is now complaining of knee pain. The knee appears deformed. What should you do?”

Size up the scene and form an initial impression. Obtain consent. all 9-1-1 or the designated emergency
number. Have the person rest without moving and apply old (if tolerated) until EMS personnel arrive.

 

“A person begins to choke on a piece of food. You ask the person if you can help. He is unable to answer you, but nods. He has a weak, ineffective cough. What should you do?”

Have someone all 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number immediately while you give back blows and abdominal thrusts.

 

“What is the best way to check to see if an adult or child is unresponsive? An infant?”

Shout, tap on shoulder (adult or child) or foot (infant), shout again, using person’s name if you know it

 

“Name two things you should be prepared to tell the dispatcher when calling 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number.”

The location of the emergency, the telephone number of the phone you are calling from, a description of what happened, the number of injured or ill people, what help has been given so far

 

“Why is it important to remove soiled gloves properly?”

To avoid transferring potentially infectious material on the outside of the gloves to your skin or other surfaces

 

“Name two signs and symptoms of hypothermia.”

Indifference,

disorientation or confusion;

loss of consciousness;

“glassy” stare;

shivering progressing to absence of shivering

 

“Name an injury that could cause a concussion.”

Any injury involving a bump, blow or jolt to the head or body that results in rapid movement of the head (e.g., a sports injury, a fall)

 

“Name two signs and symptoms of shock.”

Restlessness or irritability;

changes in level of consciousness;

pale, ashen or grayish, cool, moist skin;

rapid breathing and pulse;

excessive thirst;

nausea or vomiting

 

“Name two signs and symptoms of a muscle, bone or joint injury.”

Pain;

swelling;

bruising;

an inability or unwillingness to move the injured body part;

abnormal appearance of the injured body part (bent, rooked, deformed);

a popping, snapping or grating sound

 

“What does the mnemonic RICE stand for?”

Rest, immobilization, cold, elevation

 

“Name two factors that could make it necessary to all 9-1-1 or the designated emergency number for a burn injury.” – a critical burn

The depth of the burn;

The percentage of the body’s surface area that is burned; (more than one body part, or a large percentage of the person’s total body area)

the location of the burn; (hands, feet or groin; head neck or mouth; or affect the person’s ability to breathe; and circumferential burns – those that go all the way around a limb)

the age of the person; (younger than 5 years or older than 60 years, unless the burn is very minor)

the cause of the burn (electricity, exposure to chemicals, exposure to nuclear radiation, or an explosion)

 

Name two signs and symptoms of a heart attack.

chest pain, discomfort, pressure or squeezing;

discomfort or pain that spreads to one or both arms, the back, the shoulder, the neck, the jaw or the upper part of the stomach;

dizziness or lightheadedness;

trouble breathing;

nausea or vomiting; pale or ashen (gray) skin; sweating;

a feeling of anxiety or doom;

extreme fatigue;

unresponsiveness
 

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