Why so many rules?

Some of the rules are required by the college
for any college club off-campus event.

(For example, the release every student must sign before they can go off campus.)
 
National Parks we visit also have rules and regulations. Some of them are for protection of visitors, some for the protection of resources, and many have fines associated with them if you break them.

sign says: Removing or possessing natural or cultural resources (such as wild-flowers, antlers, rocks, and arrowheads) is strictly prohibited.

sign about bikes permitted

Yosemite sign that says fireworks prohibited

 

As you read through a trip agreement you will need to sign,
you might recognize that some of the things you must agree to do or not do are there because previous people have had troubles.

And the club advisor got tired of dressing people in plastic garbage bags when they did not follow trip rules about being prepared with reeeeeally waterproof rain gear:

rain gear: models show real rain jackets and plastic garbage bag gear

There are crucial things wrong with each of these tents that can cause a lot of misery.


Don’t buy a cheap tent has reasons why and more examples of tents to NOT bring.

And for a laugh, ( and so you won’t need to be added to the lists) mistakes from years of Outdoor Club trips are at camping blunders.
 

But you are an adult,
why can’t you choose which risks to take?

Because you are participating in a college sponsored event,
not doing these activities on your own time.


 
At many National Park Service (NPS) webpages you will often see
“You are responsible for your own safety.”

But to help you be safe, the NPS has rules and regulations, signage warning of dangers, handouts or newsletters given to you as you arrive at the park or check into a campground or hotel (and often available online before your trip). When you check in to a Yosemite lodge / hotel / tent cabin you might see a sign
sign that says bears are very active

and you might sign a paper including initialing a few sentences saying that you understand, for example:

you can be fined and your car can be towed for improper food storage from NPS video

 
The Outdoor Club has detailed trip agreements.

see sample trip agreements for

the between summer-and-fall-quarter tip to Grand Teton National Park

the winter Yosemite National park trip

(usually May and October) Monterey kayak day trip

 
stones in a row on a wall

Yosemite National Park regulations, policies and rules links

 
Drivers should note that there are sections of road in Yosemite Valley with two lanes (usually) in the same direction, with the right lane ONLY for the free shuttle buses, ambulances, ski bus, commercial vehicles with ten or more passengers. The NPS says: “The bus lane ensures emergency vehicles can respond to incidents when traffic is backed up and provides preference for mass transit.”

Parking and traffic jams in Yosemite valley tips and tricks has the above advice, with maps of each of the three major day-use parking lots, with advice to help you NOT get a Yosemite National Park traffic or parking ticket, and not contribute to preventable traffic backups. And some details of where you can’t park in Yosemite, or can’t park without a permit.

sign that says camp 4 parking permit required 24 hours

 

park Ranger talks to a driver

Top reasons not to speed in a National Park

stones forming a wall

We advise people to check everything that powers, stops, cools, heats, ventilates and lights their vehicle before they leave on an adventure. Road trip vehicle prep and recommended service has checklists (including many things people can do without a mechanic).

If the owner of the Buick below had cleaned the battery terminals before the trip, the half hour spent trying to get his car to start the last morning of the 2016 winter Yosemite trip could have been spent on something more fun.

KODAK Digital Still Camera