Grand Tetons beaver lodge pictures

beaver lodge Grand Tetons:

beaver at water surface eating leaves

Beavers eat about 2 pounds of bark a day. When they eat the bark off branches they will hold the branch in their forefeet and turn it like humans do when eating a cob of corn.

Cottonwood, aspen and willows are favorites.

They can cut through a 5 inch diameter tree in 5 minutes.

 
We found this tree on an island in Jackson Lake, Grand Teton National Park.

We could clearly see the pattern of the teeth marks.
Aspen stump and tree with beaver teeth markspeople taking pictures of a log beavers had taken down

beaver eating leaves

Beavers use their tails as rudders as they swim,
to slap the water when they want to warn other beavers they see something dangerous
(like you, perhaps)
and to help them stand up to reach for and chew branches. NPS photos:

beaver standing upright

beaver nibbling

beaver swimming: beaver bringing stick:

They build their dams first by felling whole trees, then adding mud and rocks at the bottom. Then they fill in with branches, reeds, saplings and mud.
They cut more trees and branches and submerge them for winter food, one end down in the mud in the pond their dam made.
They let a little water out of the dam after ice covers it to allow for breathing.

Below a beaver dam and the pond it created:

small pond behind beaver dam

and a beaver lodge:

beaver lodge with pond in foreground

and another beaver lodge at the edge of Oxbow Bend where we often kayak:

beaver house, a mound of mud and branches

a beaver-made dam at Schwabachers Landing:

dam in river and mountain peaks behind

and here a dam with the lodge in the pond created by the dam:

beaver dam and pond

single beaver on top of dam: beaver climbing up dam: beavers grooming:

They groom their fur with the two nails on their hindfoot and waterproof the fur with castoreum from a gland.

Can stay submerged for 15 minutes.

beaver with big tail:

Mom sometimes carries babies on her flat tail or in her forepaws walking upright. The babies (kits) can swim in the lodge entrance within a half hour and are good swimmers within a week.

NPS notes:

“Crepuscular: active in evening and morning.

If living on rivers, may build bank dens instead of lodges.

One colony may support 2–14 beavers that are usually related. Six is considered average.

35–40 inches long, including tail.

Weighs 30–60 pounds.

Average life span: 5 years.

Male and female beavers look alike—thick brown fur, paddle-shaped tail.

Like wolves, beavers live in family groups, which are called colonies. Fewer than 5% of mammals live organized like this.”

NPS photo of a beaver swimming:

NPS photo beaver swimming

Rocky Mountain mammal size comparisons has photos and comparisons of beavers, squirrels, pika, marmot, elk, moose, bison, fox, coyote, wolf, golden-mantled ground squirrel, chipmunk, Red Squirrel (also known as) Chickaree, Unita Ground squirrels, bobcat, lynx, mountain lion (cougar), pine marten, mountain goats, bighorn sheep, pronghorn, grizzly and black bears, tundra swan, trumpeter swan, adult and juvenile Bald Eagles.

The page includes this:

From a distance it can be hard to tell which small animal you see swimming. But each swims differently.

Muskrat swimming:

muskrat in water

Beaver swimming:

beaver in water
River otters undulate through the water. One source says when a beaver swims, only his head shows above the water; muskrats show both their head and part of their back. Another source says that muskrats usually swim with their thin tails “snaking in the water behind them or arched out of the water; you never see a beaver’s tail as it swims.”

Adult muskrats are the size of a football, (their body 16-24 inches long, long narrow tail 7-11 inches),

beavers four times as big. (Beavers reach lengths of three to four feet and weights of up to 40 pounds and can live up to 24 years in the wild.).

Otters are 3 to 4 feet long, minks (rarely seen) half that size.
long stripe of lake water

 

___________________________________


Grand Teton National Park birds has photos and details about the most common ones we can hope to see
including Bald Eagle, Red-winged Blackbird, Canada Geese, Clark’s Nutcracker, Golden Eagle, Great Blue Heron.Great Gray Owl, Harlequin duck, Loon, Magpie, Merganser, Northern Flicker (woodpecker), Osprey, Ouzel, Pelican, Peregrine Falcon, Ptarmigan, Raven, Sandhill Cranes, Steller’s Jays, Trumpeter Swan, Western Meadowlark and Western Tanager, with links to calls / songs from most of them to listen to.

and you can Download photos of over a hundred birds of Grand Teton National Park
https://www.audubon.org/climate/national-parks/grand-teton-national-park

hawk flying

___________________________________

 

Grand Tetons recommended reading has links to on-line bird and mammal field guides, as well as books to buy or check out from the library before the trip

Your safety in grizzly bear territory

People often get too close to animals when they are trying to take a selfie.

Grand Tetons is the main page about the De Anza Outdoor Club trips to Grand Teton National Park.

Grand Tetons trip pages index

Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Park photos

For actual incidents of injuries from animals, usually caused by approaching them too closely, go to: fatal, near fatal or close call incidents/accidents in camping, backpacking, climbing and mountaineering

Look for the BEARS, MOUNTAIN LION, BISON, ELK and MOOSE sections.

 
nps drawing bears: drawing of a black bear and a grizzly for comparisonWas that a black bear or a grizzly, a coyote or a wolf or a fox we just saw?

NPS photo Yellowstone wildlife montage Robert Hynes 560 pxls: Rocky Mountain mammal size comparisons has photos and comparisons of beavers, squirrels, pika, marmot, elk, moose, bison, fox, coyote, wolf, golden-mantled ground squirrel, chipmunk, Red Squirrel (also known as) Chickaree, Unita Ground squirrels, bobcat, lynx, mountain lion (cougar), pine marten, mountain goats, bighorn sheep, pronghorn, grizzly and black bears, tundra swan, trumpeter swan, adult and juvenile Bald Eagles.